The best news for Baby Boomers: babyboomers.com

Baby Boomers roared through their teens and 20s -- taking much of American culture along for the ride. By sheer numbers, Baby Boomers influenced everything from music to merchandise. Then they settled down to be scientists and business leaders, lawyers and legislators, journalists and artists. Born between the years of 1946 and 1964, Baby Boomers are in the prime of life -- influential and impactful. The website babyboomers.com addresses topics and issues that concern all of us, including and especially Baby Boomers -- lifestyle, relationships, money, healthy living, travel and more. It's an exciting site -- and I'm enjoying working with a terrific staff as the new editor. www.babyboomers.com

Writing for GRAND Magazine

Shortly after GRAND Magazine listed Good to be Grand as #1 on its "Best Books for Grandparents," I became acquainted with the editor of GRAND, Christine Crosby. GRAND became all digital on 2014 and that has opened up an opportunity for linking grandparents and prospective grandparents to interesting content, both in print and digital -- not just about grandparenting but about this grand time of life.

The latest issue of GRAND includes an article I wrote on 21st Century Grandparenting  http://www.grandmagazine.com/2017/10/grandparenting-21st-century-style/

And grandmagazine.com just published my mini-essay "The perfection of our imperfect grandshildren" http://www.grandmagazine.com/2017/11/perfection-imperfect-grandchildren/

 

More writing:

Media as Watchdog: Without journalists we can trust, how will we know the truth?

Back before social media, the press played an important role in our democracy. And that was the role of watchdog: Exposing people (including our leaders) who were doing things they weren’t supposed to do, examining their statements and giving them the litmus test of accuracy. If we lose that, we lose an important check and balance that protects our power as “we the people.”

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Good to Be Grand -- How it all started

When I was about to become a grandmother, I was looking for information and inspiration! I searched for a book that would tell me what’s still true about childcare and child development. A book that would teach me about new techniques, new equipment, and new parenting philosophies. A book that would help navigate changing family dynamics and prepare me for this important new phase.
 
I couldn’t find that book anywhere. So I wrote Good to Be Grand.

Prepare for this transformative stage of life—and make the baby’s first year one of the most meaningful experiences for both of you.


Praise for Good to Be Grand

 

If only every stage of life had a book like this to go with it. Good to Be Grand not only informs but highlights the opportunity to approach grandparenting with intention and along the way discover new areas of personal growth.
— Linda Renzi. MA, LCPC
Clear Path Center for Well-Being
Cheryl Harbour’s Good to Be Grand is a great read for any new grandparent. I recommend the book as a resource for parents and grandparents alike. Harbour’s organization around “What’s Still True?”/“What’s New?” gives grandparents and new parents a chance to open a dialogue about generational differences in parenting while exploring together what is best for the newest member(s) of the family. Good to Be Grand is solidly grounded in current knowledge of child and family development yet accessible to anyone interested in learning more about the life-changing experience of grandparenting, which I believe is the most important family role of this century.
— Roma Stovall Hanks, PhD
Professor and Department Chair
Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work
Research Director, Center for Generational Studies
University of South Alabama, Mobile AL
Becoming a grandparent is full of blessings as well as often unexpected challenges. In this engaging book, Cheryl Harbour shows us that grandparenting isn’t just a simple reboot of the parenting role, but will require learning new skills, both communicative and practical, as well as rediscovering forgotten joys. She is a wise and appealing companion for this journey and she has written a lively, accessible and informative guide that will be welcomed by anyone embarking on this wondrous phase of life.
— Michael O.L. Seabaugh, Ph.D, Psychologist, Writer
When you start to read this book, be prepared to smile, learn, think, reflect, reminisce, and chuckle...all the way to the end. Armed with current knowledge on baby care and child development, you will be ready to enjoy and enrich your family life in the role of a grandparent.
— Lois Kercher, PhD, R.N.
former President of National Association of Nurse Executives